Polls find dead heat in Marriage Amendment, edge for Voter ID support

Two new Minnesota Polls by the Star Tribune find a statistical dead head in the constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage, but a slight edge for support of a constitutional change that would require voters to show a government-issued photo ID.
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Two new Star Tribune Minnesota Polls find a statistical dead head in the constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage, and a slight edge for support of a constitutional change that would require voters to show a government-issued photo ID.

In the Marriage Amendment poll, 49 percent favor the measure that would define marriage between one man and one woman, while 47 percent oppose it. Four percent are undecided. In order for the measure to pass, there must be 50 percent approval.

Results in the Voter ID poll show an edge for supporters of the measure at 52 percent, with 44 percent against and four percent undecided. The poll results also indicated a huge drop in support for the measure from a May 2011 poll, where 80 percent of those surveyed supported the measure.

Meanwhile a Pioneer Press report reflects on the huge movement of Voter ID measures since the 2000 presidential election, where the Supreme Court intervened after flaws were revealed in Florida's voting system.

The report says more than 1,000 Voter ID measures have been introduced in 46 states since 2001. Since then 33 states have passed Voter ID laws and 30 more will be on ballots this November.

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