Prosecutors open case against alleged Minneapolis gang leader

The prosecution considers Joe Gustafson, Sr., the CEO of a criminal organization. They say he's been the patriarch of the "Beat Down Posse" for nearly 20 years. Gustafson's lawyers are expected to put the blame on his son, who will stand trial in the spring.
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The prosecution considers Joe Gustafson, Sr., the CEO of a criminal organization. They say he's been the patriarch of the "Beat Down Posse" for nearly 20 years. Gustafson's lawyers are expected to put the blame on his son, who will stand trial in the spring.

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