Rain coming, but drought not leaving

Temperatures will drop throughout the day Thursday, and Friday will be sunny and cooler – the Twin Cities will wake up to about 28 degrees. Then rain is likely throughout Saturday, local forecasters say. The parched metro could get the most significant rainfall it has had in two to three months, but that's not saying much – less than an inch is likely.
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Rain is likely Saturday, with the possibility of thunderstorms, local forecasters say. The parched metro could get the most significant rainfall it has had in two to three months – probably less than an inch, perhaps .5 to .75, MPR says.

The last time more than .25 inch of rain fell in the metro was Aug. 15 when the cities got .73 of an inch, MPR says. Heavier rains could fall to the east; parts of Wisconsin could get multi-inch levels, MPR reports.

The Twin Cities has had only about 1.5 inches of rain total since the beginning of August, and was nearly 5.5 inches below normal for August and September, KARE 11 reports.

The Star Tribune says Minnesota was the driest of nine Upper Midwest states in September, when Hurricane Isaac's remnants generously dropped 5 to 15 inches of rain from Missouri to Ohio, but none of it came north.

Tuesday morning's rain in the metro was barely enough to wet the dust in the bottom of a rain gauge, but it was the first measurable precipitation this month: .03 inch, the newspaper reports.

Friday morning will be a lot chillier than it was today – about 28 degrees vs. the 52 people woke up to Thursday, WCCO reports.

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