Rain, hot temperatures help double Minnesota mosquito population

Thanks to the second-wettest Minnesota June on record and hot temperatures this month, the mosquito population in the state has exploded. The Metropolitan Mosquito Control District says a sampling of its 134 traps July 2 found an average of 1,425 adult mosquitoes per trap, more than double the average for the same date for the past nine years, which was 643 mosquitoes per trap.
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Thanks to the second-wettest Minnesota June on record and hot temperatures this month, the mosquito population in the state has exploded. The Metropolitan Mosquito Control District says a sampling of its 134 traps July 2 found an average of 1,425 adult mosquitoes per trap, more than double the average for the same date for the past nine years, which was 643 mosquitoes per trap.

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