Record incomes helps Minnesota farming attract younger people

Corn and soybean prices are near historic highs and that's drawing a new generation to crop farming. The president of the Minnesota Farmers Union told The Oklahoman the new interest is a welcome sign after the average age of a Minnesota farmer hit 55.3 in 2007. “You have to have new people to come into any business or industry if it is to stay alive," Doug Peterson said.
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Corn and soybean prices are near historic highs and that's drawing a new generation to crop farming. The president of the Minnesota Farmers Union told The Oklahoman the new interest is a welcome sign after the average age of a Minnesota farmer hit 55.3 in 2007. “You have to have new people to come into any business or industry if it is to stay alive," Doug Peterson said.

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