Report estimates 1.4 million pounds of pollutants dumped into Minnesota rivers annually

According to the report by Environment Minnesota, about half of the toxic chemicals are dumped into the Mississippi River. The Blue Earth and Rainy rivers also rank high in industrial pollutants.
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According to the report by Environment Minnesota, about half of the toxic chemicals are dumped into the Mississippi River. The Blue Earth and Rainy rivers also rank high in industrial pollutants.

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Group nets trash out of Mississippi River to make sculpture

Volunteers collected trash at the seventh annual Mississippi River cleanup at St. Cloud’s Wilson Park Saturday, but not all of the discarded items are going in the dump. An artist is sifting through the junk for a sculpture to be displayed during the city's art crawl next month, and he has plenty of items to choose from, including a TV, a manhole cover and even a message in a bottle.

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International effort cuts pollution in Lake Superior basin

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Minn. River getting cleaner, MPCA says

Minnesota environmental officials say cleanup efforts to cut phosphorous levels in the Minnesota River are making a difference, the Star Tribune reports. After testing this summer, the Pollution Control Agency found oxygen levels in one of the state's dirtiest waterways are better than expected. The agency credits a 2004 phosphorous reduction plan for sewage treatment plants