Reporter Heather Brown returns to WCCO-TV

After spending the last two years reporting for WNYW in New York, reporter Heather Brown is coming back to WCCO. Brown says her first day on the job in Minneapolis is Monday. She is currently working for the CBS affiliate in New York covering the devastation from storms on the East Coast.
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After spending the last two years reporting for WNYW in New York, reporter Heather Brown is coming back to WCCO.

In an interview with WCCO Radio, Brown says her first day on the job in Minneapolis is Monday. She is currently working for the CBS affiliate in New York covering the devastation from storms on the East Coast.

Brown told TV Spy she's coming back to the Twin Cities to spend more time with family.

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