Republican lawmakers propose right-to-work amendment

The constitutional amendment would not allow contracts to require employees to join unions or pay dues. Sen. Dave Thompson of Lakeville continues to stress the measure will not impact collective bargaining in Minnesota.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

The constitutional amendment would not allow contracts to require employees to join unions or pay dues. Sen. Dave Thompson of Lakeville continues to stress the measure will not impact collective bargaining in Minnesota.

Next Up

Related

Governor complains about legislature's push for constitutional amendments

Governor Mark Dayton says legislators should engage in 'give and take' instead of going around him with constitutional amendments. He says he's most concerned about measures that take away people's rights. The legislature approved a measure to let voters decide on same-sex marriage. Both houses have also approved voter I.D. amendment bills. Some lawmakers are pushing for a amendment to ban mandatory union membership.

Worries about political backlash have Republicans backing away from right-to-work

Union-weakening legislation in several Midwestern states has lost momentum since swarms of protesters mobbed Indiana's capitol after a right-to-work measure passed there. While some Minnesota Republicans still want to pursue a Constitutional amendment, others are leery of the prospect of busloads of protesters at the Capitol and an energized union vote at the polls.

Union workers pack Capitol as 'right to work' proposal goes to Senate committee

Union members by the hundreds filed into the state Capitol on Monday morning as a group of Senate lawmakers discussed a proposed constitutional amendment that would make it harder for unions to organize. Critics of the bill say it would lower wages and cut benefits for middle-class families. Supporters say it would help businesses create new jobs.

GOP lawmakers push amendments to state constitution in 2012

The Republican controlled House and Senate are looking to make nearly a dozen changes this year, but without Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton's approval. Lawmakers can make this happen by passing legislation that puts an amendment on the November ballot. KARE 11 reports the same sex marriage legislation is the only amendment on this year's ballot right now, but others being considered include Voter ID laws, Right to Work issues, abortion restrictions and tax limitations.

Ritchie also reworks ballot title of voter photo ID amendment

Minnesota Secretary of State Mark Ritchie is changing the title of the constitutional amendment to “Changes to in-person & absentee voting & voter registration; provisional ballots." Sponsors of the measure, seeking to require voters to show a photo ID before casting a ballot, want the question titled "Photo Identification Required for Voting." Ritchie is being sued for changing the title on the marriage amendment question.