Research project shines light on U.S.-Dakota War

The Minnesota History Center for two years has been intensely researching the six-week conflict in 1862 and what led up to one of the most heart-breaking chapters in state history, KARE 11 reports. Research of the complex episode included interviews with direct descendants of settlers and native people. The culmination of the work will be on display beginning Saturday, in time for the 150th anniversary of the war.
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At the end of the conflict, 303 Dakota men were condemned to death by a U.S. court after very brief trials, KARE reports. President Abraham Lincoln approved the death sentences for 39 of them. One was given a reprieve, and 38 men were hanged in Mankato. It was the largest mass execution in U.S. history.

Here's more on the Minnesota History Center exhibit on the war that changed Minnesota forever.

The Brown County Historical Society in New Ulm is also commemorating the 150th anniversary of the conflict in mid-August.

KARE has a close look at the conflict and the research project to document it:

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