Rev. Billy Graham endorses Minnesota marriage amendment

The aging but still influential evangelist Billy Graham, perhaps wading into politics more now in his later years, has announced his support for the marriage amendment in Minnesota that defines marriage as between a man and a woman.
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The Rev. Billy Graham, noting his longtime Minnesota ties, says he supports the ballot measure in Minnesota that would create a constitutional amendment to define marriage as between one man and one woman. His statement:

"For more than 50 years, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association was based in Minneapolis and we were blessed by the support of thousands of Minnesotans who helped us spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ around the world. As a former resident with strong personal and ministry ties to the North Star State, I pray that the good people of Minnesota will show their support for God's definition of marriage, between a man and a woman. I wholeheartedly endorse the Marriage Protection Amendment, and urge you to vote Yes to pass Amendment 1."

Observers note that after long shunning partisan politics, Graham may be getting more political in his twilight years, Religion News Service reports. Graham in May was also in an ad supporting a North Carolina referendum that would ban gay marriage, RNS notes.

That may be in part the influence of his son, Franklin, who writes a letter titled "This Could Be America's Last Call..." on the Billy Graham Evangelical Association website. He writes, "My father watches the news every day, and he is deeply concerned about the enormous moral issues facing our country. That’s why your vote on November 6 is so critical."

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