Deceased city council president re-elected by Rochester voters

Rochester City Council president Dennis Hanson, who died of a brain aneurysm in late June, prevailed on Tuesday with 51.4 percent of the votes, the Post Bulletin reports. Challenger Jan Throndson garnered 43 percent and write-in candidate Jeff Thompson received 5.6 percent. A special election will likely be held next spring.
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Rochester City Council president Dennis Hanson, who died of a brain aneurysm in late June, prevailed on Tuesday with 51.4 percent of the votes, the Post Bulletin reports. Challenger Jan Throndson garnered 43 percent and write-in candidate Jeff Thompson received 5.6 percent.

"It was an unconventional type of election, obviously, and we had a simple message — vote for a choice. So the big winner is the city of Rochester. Now, others can step up to the plate, and we can have a choice," John Eckerman, who led Hanson's re-election campaign, told the newspaper.

Rochester voters will return to the polls next spring for a special election to fill the seat. If more than two candidates file, there will also be a special primary.

Minnesota law prohibited Hanson's name from being removed from the ballot despite his death, KSTP reports. Watch the story below:

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