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Ruling requires Wells Fargo to face class action suit

A federal judge in St. Paul rules Well Fargo must face a group lawsuit for promoting a risky securities-lending program. The bank's lawyers say they will appeal.
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A federal judge in St. Paul rules Well Fargo must face a group lawsuit for promoting a risky securities-lending program. The bank's lawyers say they will appeal.

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