School officials will answer to Feds

Minnesota is one of 11 states appealing to the federal government for a No Child Left Behind waiver request that could alter the criteria used for measuring a school's success. National officials say more information is necessary to determine how schools should be measured.
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Minnesota is one of 11 states appealing to the federal government for a No Child Left Behind waiver request that could alter the criteria used for measuring a school's success. National officials say more information is necessary to determine how schools should be measured.

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