Scientists are puzzled as they find more and more mercury in Great Lakes wildlife

Loons in Wisconsin, and walleye and northern pike in Minnesota are among the species showing increasing levels of mercury contamination. At this point, scientists don't know why the levels are rising.
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Loons in Wisconsin, and walleye and northern pike in Minnesota are among the species showing increasing levels of mercury contamination. At this point, scientists don't know why the levels are rising.

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