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Scientists say winter bug could offer clues to climate change

Researchers from the University of Minnesota are studying a cold-hardy bug that serves as a filling meal for trout during the winter season. The insect has little tolerance for warmth, and scientists tell the Star Tribune that even a small fluctuation in temperature could cause changes in the ecosystem.
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Researchers from the University of Minnesota are studying a cold-hardy bug that serves as a filling meal for trout during the winter season. The insect has little tolerance for warmth, and scientists tell the Star Tribune that even a small fluctuation in temperature could cause changes in the ecosystem.

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