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Senate approves bill that would expand right to use deadly force

A bill that would expand Minnesotans' rights to use deadly force outside their homes has passed the Senate. Supporters say it would give people more ability to protect themselves from imminent threats, but critics say it would promote "vigilante justice." Gov. Dayton has sent a strong signal that he will side with law enforcers, who say the new rules would endanger police, and veto the legislation.
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A bill that would expand Minnesotans' rights to use deadly force outside their homes has passed the Senate.

Supporters behind the Personal Protection Act say it would give Minnesotans more ability to protect themselves from violent criminals. But detractors, who say the self-defense rules now on the books should be sufficient, say the new rules would grant too much leeway and promote "vigilante justice." The Fargo Forum has more from both sides.

The House will review the bill again. If approved, it would then go to Gov. Dayton's desk. MinnPost reports the governor pledged he would wait three days before making a decision on whether to veto the legislation. But, he told Republican Rep. Tony Cornish, "I give serious weight to the unanimous opposition from law enforcement."

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