Senjem: 'Right to work' may not have enough votes to pass

A controversial measure that proponents say would create jobs but critics say would hurt middle-class families is now on life support, according to the Senate Majority Leader.
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A controversial measure that proponents say would create jobs but critics say would hurt middle-class families is now on life support, according to the Senate Majority Leader.

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Union workers pack Capitol as 'right to work' proposal goes to Senate committee

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