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Shutdown cost state nearly $60M, but saved about $65M in unpaid salaries

Budget officials say the state lost almost $50 million in revenue and spent about $10 million preparing for and recovering from the shutdown. But those costs were more than offset by roughly 22,000 layoffs. Still, as the Associated Press reports, those figures do not reflect lost productivity or other "indirect" impacts.
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Budget officials say the state lost almost $50 million in revenue and spent about $10 million preparing for and recovering from the shutdown. But those costs were more than offset by roughly 22,000 layoffs. Still, as the Associated Press reports, those figures do not reflect lost productivity or other "indirect" impacts.

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