Side of St. Paul skyscraper setting of new Boy Scouts fundraiser

The Boy Scouts of America are recruiting people to rappel 300 feet down the side of the Ecolab Corporate Center for a fundraiser in September. One of the people already signed up to scale one of the tallest buildings in downtown St. Paul is Ecolab chairman and CEO Doug Baker, who plans on waving to his employees outside their windows on the way down.
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The Boy Scouts of America are recruiting people to rappel 300 feet down the side of the Ecolab Corporate Center for a fundraiser in September. One of the people already signed up to scale one of the tallest buildings in downtown St. Paul is Ecolab chairman and CEO Doug Baker, who plans on waving to his employees outside their windows on the way down.

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