Slow growth means Minnesota will likely face another budget deficit

The state's top economist says growth just isn't what it needs to be to keep the state in the black. The governor and the Legislature based their previous budget deal on growth of about 3.2 percent. Unfortunately, that's not what we're seeing, and that means Dayton and legislators will likely have to wrestle over another deficit soon.
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The state's top economist says growth just isn't what it needs to be to keep the state in the black. The governor and the Legislature based their previous budget deal on growth of about 3.2 percent. Unfortunately, that's not what we're seeing, and that means Dayton and legislators will likely have to wrestle over another deficit soon.

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