Social Security cuts would hit rural areas hardest - Bring Me The News

Social Security cuts would hit rural areas hardest

In Minnesota's metropolitan counties 14 percent of residents receive Social Security benefits. In rural counties it's more than 23 percent.
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In Minnesota's metropolitan counties 14 percent of residents receive Social Security benefits. In rural counties it's more than 23 percent.

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