Somali youth group in Minneapolis wins award from FBI

Less than a week ago a high-profile federal trial ended with the conviction of a Minneapolis man for recruiting Twin Cities youth to fight with the Somali terrorist group al-Shabab. Now a Minneapolis youth group founded to prevent the radicalization of young Somali men is gaining recognition ... from the FBI.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Less than a week ago a high-profile federal trial ended with the conviction of a Minneapolis man for recruiting Twin Cities youth to fight with the Somali terrorist group al-Shabab. Now a Minneapolis youth group founded to prevent the radicalization of young Somali men is gaining recognition ... from the FBI.

Next Up

Related

Minnesota experience inspires novel about Somali teen radicalization crisis

An author who lives in Minneapolis explores the radicalization of Somali teens in his new book 'Crossbones'. Nuruddin Farah was born in Somalia. His book follows a war correspondent who is on a quest to find his missing nephew believed to be fighting for a terrorist group in Mogadishu. Farah delves into the world of war profiteers who exploit the weaknesses of the innocent.

FBI looking for missing money in Minnesota or South Dakota

Law enforcement officials need the public's help in locating five bags full of cash that was either lost or misplaced by Rochester Armored Car about two weeks ago in eastern South Dakota or southwestern Minnesota, KELO-TV reports. A Minneapolis FBI agent says the money was placed in clear plastic bags. Anyone who finds the cash or know where it's at must notify authorities or you could be prosecuted.

Family: Minnesota Somali man left to join al-Shabab

Another young Somali man in Minnesota has gone to Somalia to join al-Shabab, his family says, renewing fears that the terror group is still recruiting Somalis living in the U.S. to return to their homeland to fight, the Associated Press reports.

Judge reinstates contempt charges for woman convicted in Somali terror case

A Minneapolis federal judge reinstated charges against a woman who refused to stand in court because of her religious beliefs. Amina Farah Ali was cited for contempt 20 times while she stood trial last year. Ali and Hawo Mohamed Hassan were convicted for providing financial support to the terrorist group Al-Shabab. Tuesday's ruling affects 19 of those charges but the judge dropped the previously imposed jail time. The two have not been sentenced.