Some jobs 'reshore' back to Minnesota

The hassle of operating abroad has triggered several Minnesota companies to move production stateside, a move called "reshoring" by some, the Star Tribune reports. Coming home not only bolsters the speed, quality and simplicity of doing business, it's also more economical than it used to be.
Author:
Publish date:

The hassle of operating abroad has triggered several Minnesota companies to move production stateside, a move called "reshoring" by some, the Star Tribune reports. Coming home not only bolsters the speed, quality and simplicity of doing business, it's also more economical than it used to be.

Next Up

Related

How do we make Minnesota more attractive for jobs?

While the question of how we make our state attractive for businesses to expand and move to Minnesota is a good one, there does not seem to be agreement on how to make this happen. Business contributor John Alexander has some suggestions...

Frandsen moves Nebraska jobs to Minnesota

The animal care products manufacturer will also move its 15 employees to their facility in Glencoe. Frandsen officials say they're moving in order to be closer to the company's headquarters in North Branch.

Teen job market improves in Minnesota

The number of jobs held by teens in Minnesota has declined during the past decade, with fewer than half of them holding jobs. But it's better than last year, said an official with Minnesota's Department of Employment and Economic Development. And it's better for Minnesota teens than teens in the rest of the nation, where only 25 percent are employed.

Job openings surge in Minnesota

Job vacancies were up nearly 50 percent in the fourth quarter of 2011, compared with the same period a year earlier. Employers reported nearly 50,000 job openings, according to the latest figures from the Department of Employment and Economic Development.

Google chairman: No jobs to come for Minnesota

However, when questioned about bringing tech jobs to the area -- Eric Schmidt says Google doesn't have any future plans in Minnesota. The company says its web-based tools have provided more than $1 billion in economic value to the state.