Some Minnesota ballot question donors face state regulation - Bring Me The News

Some Minnesota ballot question donors face state regulation

The Campaign Finance and Disclosure Board says in some circumstances, groups funded by private donations that take sides on ballot measures -- like next year's marriage amendment -- will have to report the exact source of those donations with the state.
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The Campaign Finance and Disclosure Board says in some circumstances, groups funded by private donations that take sides on ballot measures -- like next year's marriage amendment -- will have to report the exact source of those donations with the state.

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More questions could be headed to Minnesota's 2012 ballot

The marriage amendment may not be the only proposed Constitutional amendment put to the state's voters this year. Republican lawmakers are considering ballot questions on other issues. Those include needing an ID to vote, needing a supermajority to pass a tax increase, and making union membership voluntary.

State accepts 70,000 absentee ballots, mail-in voters face risk

Secretary of State Mark Ritchie announced Thursday that about half of absentee ballots issued have been returned and accepted. More than 140,000 voters requested absentee ballots and 70,899 were returned and accepted. Election official Joe Mansky says there is a greater chance that a voter's ballot won't be counted when voting absentee because it's easier to make mistakes.

Ritchie changes title of the marriage amendment ballot question

Secretary of State Mark Ritchie has submitted the title “Limiting the Status of Marriage to Opposite Sex Couples" to Attorney General Lori Swanson for final approval, the Associated Press reports. Supporters of the constitutional amendment want it titled, "Recognition of Marriage Solely Between One Man and One Woman."

Blank ballots could seal fate of marriage amendment

After so many fierce debates, months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, the marriage amendment could be decided by people who leave the question blank on their ballots, MPR reports. A blank ballot counts as a "no" vote on the question of whether a marriage should be defined in the state constitution as between a man and woman. To be approved, the measure needs 50 percent of voters to vote "yes."

Top donor to Minnesota GOP stops giving

Bob Cummins, who has donated more than $3.5 million to Minnesota Republican causes, is telling allies he has had it with Republicans in the Minnesota Legislature and will not give their campaigns any cash this year, according to multiple sources, the Star Tribune reports. Cummins, CEO of Plymouth-based Primera Technology, is reportedly frustrated over legislators' failure to approve a "right-to-work" constitutional amendment that would limit union power.

Voter ID ballot question prompts more questions from justices

The Minnesota Supreme Court had plenty of questions for lawyers arguing the merits and shortcomings of the voter ID ballot question. Groups including the League of Women Voters say the question that will appear before voters does not accurately characterize the changes the amendment would make to the Constitution. Lawyers for the Legislature say it's up to lawmakers - not the courts - to write ballot questions.

Agency: Anti-marriage amendment donor can remain anonymous

The state campaign finance board ruled Friday that a man who contributed $600 to a group opposing the Minnesota marriage amendment can remain anonymous. The man feared he would be fired from his Catholic employer if word of his contribution became public since the Catholic Church is in favor of the amendment, which would effectively ban same-sex marriages.