Some Minnesota firearms safety instructors question online training

They tell the Star Tribune the course, made available to kids as young as 11, sacrifices safety for convenience and is a poor substitute for the traditional classroom instruction.
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They tell the Star Tribune the course, made available to kids as young as 11, sacrifices safety for convenience and is a poor substitute for the traditional classroom instruction.

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