Some Republicans want to tap arts amendment money for Vikings stadium - Bring Me The News

Some Republicans want to tap arts amendment money for Vikings stadium

MPR reports some Republican lawmakers want to use some of the state's Legacy funds to help build a new home for the Vikings. But critics say voters didn't approve the amendment to fund professional sports stadiums.
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MPR reports some Republican lawmakers want to use some of the state's Legacy funds to help build a new home for the Vikings. But critics say voters didn't approve the amendment to fund professional sports stadiums.

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Twin Cities, outstate rift forms over Legacy amendment parks money

The Legacy Amendment created a fund for improvement of Minnesota parks but the state has reached no consensus on how the money should be divided. The formula was recently changed to direct more money away from the Twin Cities area. Now the Twin Cities think the formula is unfair, while some outstate communities think the changes did not go far enough.

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