Updated:
Original:

Update: TCF Bank says its Monday issues should be fixed

The Plymouth-based bank was experiencing "processing delays" for certain deposits.
Author:

TCF Bank says the "processing delays" that kept some customers from getting deposits in their account or withdrawing cash should be fixed.

In a statement Monday afternoon, the bank said it believes the issue has been resolved, and any deposits customers were expecting in their account should be available. If you're not seeing a deposit you know should be in there, TCF says to call them at (800) 823-2265.

"We appreciate our customers’ patience during this delay," the bank added.

Read the original story from Monday morning below.

TCF Bank has some disgruntled customers on Monday morning after problems processing deposits have left people unable to access their money.

The Plymouth-based bank confirmed it is experiencing "processing delays" that surfaced in the early hours of Monday, causing some deposits not to arrive in people's checking accounts, and leaving customers unable to take cash out at ATMs or in branches.

As Monday is the first business month of April, it's meant that people expecting social security checks, paychecks, pension payments and other deposits have not seen their payments arrive in their accounts. This has put some customers in a bind, particularly those with bills due.

In a statement sent to GoMN at 12:30 p.m., TCF said that it is still working to resolve the issue and expects funds to be available "shortly." It says less than 15 percent of its customers are affected by the delay.

"Unfortunately, this issue coincides with the beginning of the month, when some customers expect to receive a direct deposit such as a paycheck or social security payment. It’s important to note that our ATM network, online banking and retail branch locations are operating normally.

Customers upset

Affected customers were posting on the bank's Facebook page, including one woman who was expecting a direct deposit to have arrived on Sunday night.

"I was expecting to pay some bills and rent today," she writes, before adding: "I wonder how many people are going to get screwed over with being overdrawn because of charges made and having no money in their account. Thank God I checked my account before making automated payments and online payments today."

Another commenter is concerned that they might be hit with overdraft charges because of automatic payments leaving their account without being backed by their deposits, while another asked the bank if they'll cover a late fee from her landlord if she can't pay her rent.

TCF told GoMN that affected customers would still be able to make withdrawals from a bank branch even if the funds are not currently available in their account. They will not be charged any fees for this.

The Star Tribune spoke to some customers at the TCF branch at the IDS Center in downtown Minneapolis, and one, Jim Kaju, reported seeing a woman crying when she couldn't access her money.

"Everyone is very upset," Kaju told the newspaper.

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