Some Wisconsin lawmakers say it's time for daylight saving time to end

The lawmakers say many people dread losing an hour of sleep.
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We're only about a month away from the night when we'll "spring forward." Well, most of us will, anyway.

March 12 at 2 a.m. is when daylight saving time begins in Minnesota, bringing a later sunrise and more light in the evening.

Over in Wisconsin, though ... who knows what will happen? A couple members of the State Assembly have launched a push to turn out the lights on daylight saving time.

Reps. Samantha Kerkman and Michael Schraa have put together a bill to ditch daylight savings and they're working to gather support from other lawmakers.

Their news release (read it on a Kenosha County news site) says many people dread the loss of an hour's sleep when the clocks are changed. They also say the switch leads to kids walking to school in the dark and to "much confusion." So the representatives think Wisconsin should skip the time change.

They also mention a couple of studies. One by a cardiologist in Denver found that on the Monday after the time change the risk of a heart attack is 25 percent higher than on other Mondays. Another study in Indiana reportedly found energy use went up by 1 percent after the state moved to daylight savings (though that would be contrary to findings in other studies).

2 states don't use daylight savings

People who support the use of daylight saving time say it helps them make use of daylight on summer evenings.

Back in the 1960s there was a lot of debate about whether to use it. WCCO says in 1965 the Twin Cities couldn't agree on what time it was, because St. Paul was using daylight savings time and Minneapolis was not.

The next year Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which standardized the switch to daylight saving time for states using it. In those days it was used from late April to late October. But since then it's been expanded to run from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November.

But the law also allows states to opt out of daylight savings. Right now Arizona and Hawaii are the only two states not using it. Wisconsin Reps. Kerkman and Schraa say in both Iowa and Michigan bills to do away with it are pending in the Legislature.

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