Someone is poisoning dogs in Hopkins and police want to know who - Bring Me The News

Someone is poisoning dogs in Hopkins and police want to know who

One dog was killed, two got sick.
Author:
Publish date:
Image placeholder title

One dog has died and two others got sick after eating poison that was left in their yard, and police want to know who's doing it.

The suspects placed dog food tainted with anti-freeze and a block of rodent poison in the yards of people who own dogs in Hopkins, Sgt. Michael Glassberg of the Hopkins Police Department told GoMN.

A man reported to police in early October that one of his dogs had died, while the other had permanent organ damage after eating dog food found in his yard – the food tested positive for antifreeze, Glassberg says. Then over the weekend, the same owner found a chunk of rodent poison in his yard.

A neighbor who lives nearby also reported their dog got sick from suspected poison around the same time, so police believe the two incidents – which happened on the 200 and 300 blocks of 9th and 10th Avenues North – are connected.

Glassberg's advice to pet owners is to be out with your pets when they're outside and watch what they're eating. And if you see something strange, call local officials.

The Hopkins Police Department is offering a $1,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest and conviction in these incidents. If you have any information on this, you're asked to send an anonymous text using the Tip411 app or call 952-938-8885.

If you think your pet ate a tainted treat – or you find one in your yard – the Animal Humane Society suggests freezing a sample of it (it helps preserve the substance for testing by authorities) and to call your veterinarian.

Reports of dogs eating poisoned treats that were deliberately left in people's yards surface every few months in Minnesota and across the country. In August WCCO reported on incidents in St. Paul and Robbinsdale where dogs got sick or died after eating poison. This 2013 Wired story looks at some incidents across the country, and in 2014, the website Dogster tried to get to the bottom of why someone would intentionally poison an animal.

Next Up

Related