St. Louis County gets $900,000 in mining royalties - Bring Me The News

St. Louis County gets $900,000 in mining royalties

The money comes from companies that are mining taconite on tax-forfeited land managed by the county. The royalty check will cover nearly one percent of St. Louis County's budget for next year. It may not be reliable income, though. A county official offers the reminder that taconite production can vary dramatically from year to year.
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The money comes from companies that are mining taconite on tax-forfeited land managed by the county. The royalty check will cover nearly one percent of St. Louis County's budget for next year. It may not be reliable income, though. A county official offers the reminder that taconite production can vary dramatically from year to year.

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