St. Paul asks for more review of kicking-cop case

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St. Paul police asked city prosecutors to review the case of a police officer who was filmed kicking a suspect on the ground in August, Pioneer Press reports.

The St. Paul prosecutors then requested that the Minneapolis city attorney's office examine the case to avoid a conflict of interest, the newspaper notes.

The move comes about a month after the Olmsted County attorney's office declined to file charges against the officer in the case due to "insufficient proof beyond a reasonable doubt" that the officer used unreasonable force. That office reviewed the case instead of Ramsey County to avoid a conflict of interest.

A St. Paul police internal affairs investigation of officers Jesse Zilge, and another officer, Matthew Gorans, continues.

At issue is an incident Aug. 28 in which Zilge and Gorans arrested Eric Hightower, 30, after Hightower's ex-girlfriend called police to report that he was stalking her. During the arrest, Zilge was filmed kicking Hightower in a five-minute, widely seen video. Gorans used Mace spray on Hightower.

The video has been viewed more than 300,000 times on YouTube.

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