St. Paul drops its U.S. Supreme Court housing code case

The city is concerned that a victory could "completely eliminate 'disparate impact' civil rights enforcement, including under the Fair Housing Act." A statement from St. Paul says this unintentional outcome is the main reason why it's dismissing the petition. The case involves a group of 16 landlords that claim the city's housing code enforcement violates the Fair Housing Act. The lawsuit will still go to trial in Federal court later this year.
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The city is concerned that a victory could "completely eliminate 'disparate impact' civil rights enforcement, including under the Fair Housing Act." A statement from St. Paul says this unintentional outcome is the main reason why it's dismissing the petition. The case involves a group of 16 landlords that claim the city's housing code enforcement violates the Fair Housing Act. The lawsuit will still go to trial in Federal court later this year.

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