St. Paul gives struggling schools more funding

St. Paul is looking to give its struggling schools a boost. Instead of distributing money to the schools based on enrollment numbers, Minnesota's second-largest district is factoring in demographics and performance of students.
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St. Paul is looking to give its struggling schools a boost. Instead of distributing money to the schools based on enrollment numbers, Minnesota's second-largest district is factoring in demographics and performance of students.

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