State again delays decision on whether to lease private property to mining companies

Some residents were surprised and upset to learn that while they might own their land, they don’t own what’s under the surface. Laws dating to the 1870s allow the state to own the minerals under property owners' land. Gov. Dayton says the state is taking time out to reconsider the rules.
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Some residents were surprised and upset to learn that while they might own their land, they don’t own what’s under the surface. Laws dating to the 1870s allow the state to own the minerals under property owners' land. Gov. Dayton says the state is taking time out to reconsider the rules.

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