Feds give Minnesota grants to more quickly pull contaminated foods

U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded the Minnesota Department of Agriculture $600,000 grant to help the department quickly trace contaminated food to grocery stores and other distribution points.
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U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded the Minnesota Department of Agriculture $600,000 grant to help the department quickly trace contaminated food to grocery stores and other distribution points, WCCO-TV reports.

The state agency said in a press release that in its grant application, it "proposed to explore the use of web-based technologies to improve the flow of information between the food industry and regulatory agencies."

Use of the grant money will be spread out over three years.

Among the foods recalled in Minnesota recently: cantaloupe, tomatoes, and meat.

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