State Education Department working toward Nov. 14 deadline to apply for NCLB waiver

There is a later deadline in February for states to apply for exemptions from the federal No Child Left Behind requirements. But Minnesota officials say that timeframe would not allow enough preparations for next school year.
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There is a later deadline in February for states to apply for exemptions from the federal No Child Left Behind requirements. But Minnesota officials say that timeframe would not allow enough preparations for next school year.

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