State health commissioner pitches horseshoe diplomacy in Rochester swing

Why should public meetings be stuffy, especially if the topic is health? Minnesota Health Commissioner Ed Ehlinger prefers the casual approach of tossing a few shoes while discussing school lunches and emergency room errors.
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Why should public meetings be stuffy, especially if the topic is health? Minnesota Health Commissioner Ed Ehlinger prefers the casual approach of tossing a few shoes while discussing school lunches and emergency room errors.

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