Students from defunct beauty school get a transfer offer - Bring Me The News

Students from defunct beauty school get a transfer offer

A Twin Cities cosmetology school says it will accept any transfer students from Regency Beauty Institute, which closed its five Minnesota campuses overnight this week.
Author:
Publish date:
Minnesota School of Cosmetology has locations in Woodbury and Plymouth.

Minnesota School of Cosmetology has locations in Woodbury and Plymouth.

Cosmetology students left out in the cold by this week's sudden closing of Regency Beauty Institute have an invitation to transfer.

Minnesota School of Cosmetology (MSC) said Friday it will accept all the credits earned by students at Regency.

An MSC spokeswoman said in an email the school will allow Regency transfers to enroll in classes that start on Oct. 10 and will assign a student mentor to each of them to help smooth their transition to the new school.

A post on the MSC Facebook page generated interested responses from some who said they'd been Regency students.

But while Regency's five Minnesota campuses included Duluth and St. Cloud as well as the Twin Cities, MSC has just two Twin Cities locations, in Woodbury and Plymouth.

Can Regency students get their money back?

That's the big question. Perhaps even a $20,000 question.

The Duluth News Tribune says that's how much students paid to enroll at Regency.

Minnesota's Office of Higher Education said in a statement this week it is working on getting refunds for students and having federal loans written off.

But getting money from Regency could be difficult, since the school cited a lack of funds as the reason for closing all 79 of its campuses around the country.

Betsy Talbot, a manager in the Office of Higher Education, told the News Tribune Minnesota law requires that Regency refund tuition and fees but added “I have not been able to get confirmation from their corporate office that they will be making those refunds.”

Next Up

Related

Transfer student enrollment to drop at U of M

Low graduation rates and poor student satisfaction among transfer students means the University of Minnesota will begin accepting fewer undergraduate transfers. The school plans for transfer students to make up 33 percent of their student population.