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Students sickened with E. coli after hunting and butchering deer for class project

Students at a Minnesota high school fell ill with a rare form of E. coli after a class project that involved hunting and butchering deer, including one road-kill capture. A report from the state Health Department says the meat had been cooked only to medium rare, which was not a high enough temperature to kill all of the bacteria.
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Students at a Minnesota high school fell ill with a rare form of E. coli after a class project that involved hunting and butchering deer, including one road-kill capture. A report from the state Health Department says the meat had been cooked only to medium rare, which was not a high enough temperature to kill all of the bacteria.

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