Study finds Minneapolis great dating city for bald, single men - Bring Me The News

Study finds Minneapolis great dating city for bald, single men

If you're a bald, single man in Minneapolis, you may be catching the attention of single women. A new study by OurTime.com, an online dating site for singles aged 50-plus, ranked Minneapolis fourth on the list of top 10 hot spots for bald men.
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If you're a bald, single man in Minneapolis, you may be catching the attention of single women. A new study by OurTime.com, an online dating site for singles aged 50-plus, ranked Minneapolis fourth on the list of top 10 hot spots for bald men.

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