Super Tuesday: Clinton, Rubio visit MN ahead of Tuesday caucuses

Author:
Publish date:
Image placeholder title

Hillary Clinton and Marco Rubio became the latest candidates to campaign in Minnesota ahead of the caucuses. Here's a look at their visit – plus where they stand in the race right now.

Clinton's campaign said Monday night the former secretary of state will be making stops in Minnesota on Tuesday. Her first stop was Mapps Coffee in Minneapolis' Cedar-Riverside neighborhood, before heading to Midtown Global Market.

https://twitter.com/golden_erin/status/704719621291581440

https://twitter.com/RobOlsonFOX9/status/704742810256334849

This is her fourth visit to Minnesota since she launched her campaign, the Pioneer Press says.

Her visit comes after her daughter, Chelsea Clinton, campaigned for her in Minnesota on Sunday and Monday, and a day after her challenger, Bernie Sanders, held a rally in Minneapolis. He also paid a visit to the Iron Range on Friday.

Rubio rallies supporters in Andover

Marco Rubio announced Sunday he'd be stopping in Minnesota to rally supporters before the caucuses.

The 12:30 p.m. rally at the Courtyards of Andover Events Center was open to the public and drew hundreds of supporters.

https://twitter.com/AngelaDavisWCCO/status/704743377569361921

https://twitter.com/peterncox/status/704744173199429632

This is Rubio’s second stop in Minnesota in a week. He rallied supporters in Minneapolis last Tuesday.

https://twitter.com/marcorubio/status/704697461244354561

How are they doing in MN?

Clinton and Rubio's visits are the latest in their efforts to drum up support ahead of Super Tuesday, when Minnesotans will head to their caucus precinct to pick their preferred candidate for president. (More information on that below.)

Hillary Clinton is coming off a big win at the South Carolina primary Saturday night, where she picked up 39 delegates, bringing her delegate total to 90, plus 453 superdelegates, RealClear Politics shows. Meanwhile, Sanders won 14 delegates in South Carolina, bringing his total to 65 delegates and 20 superdelegates.

FiveThirtyEight called Clinton’s South Carolina win her “biggest victory yet,” noting she beat Sanders by nearly 50 percentage points.

Sanders vows to fight until the Democratic National Convention this summer, but CNN is reporting Clinton’s campaign is mentioning her challenger less and less and is starting to transition its focus to the general election and Republican voters.

Going into Super Tuesday, polls show she has big leads in most of the 12 primaries and caucuses that will take place, including Minnesota, where a January poll shows her leading Sanders by 34 points. However, a recent Guardian article says the two candidates are "deadlocked" ahead of Tuesday's caucuses.

Politico says Minnesota is one of the two key states to watch to gauge Sanders' overall performance, noting if he can’t win here – a place Sanders’ campaign sees as his “sweet spot” because of its progressive, largely white population – it probably won’t be a very good Super Tuesday for him.

As for Rubio, his recent visits to Minnesota may be because he’s looking for an “outright win” on Super Tuesday to avoid being swept in other states, Politico says, noting Minnesota will be a “true wildcard” on Super Tuesday.

The most recent poll shows Rubio leading by two points in Minnesota, while Donald Trump is ahead in other Super Tuesday states, NBC News says.

Rubio isn’t the only Republican to campaign in Minnesota as of late. Ted Cruz’s father was in Minnesota Saturday to rally supporters. And Glen Beck campaigned for Cruz in Minneapolis Monday, KARE 11's John Croman tweeted.

Trump, who is the front-runner in the Republican race so far, hasn’t announced any plans to visit Minnesota before Tuesday, and the Star Tribune says he’s the only top contender from both parties who hasn’t come to the state.

Despite never visiting Minnesota, Trump has a lot of momentum going into Super Tuesday. Republican Party Chairman Keith Downey told the paper he thinks Trump, Rubio and Cruz all have a chance at winning Minnesota.

The other two names on the Republican caucus ballots are Ohio Gov. John Kasich and former neurosurgeon Ben Carson, the Pioneer Press says.

Planning to caucus? Here's what you need to know

To participate in a party's caucus on Tuesday, you have to be at least 18 at the time of the November election and generally agree with the party's principles, according to state law.

Then, all you have to do is show up at your party's precinct caucus. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m., with the caucuses starting at 7 p.m.

You can search for your precinct caucus on the Secretary of State's website here. If you identify more with a minor party, you can find out where to caucus by clicking here. (Note: There is no absentee voting option on caucus night. )

All voting must be completed by 8 p.m. But that's not the end of the night. After the presidential preference ballot, caucus-goers will discuss resolutions and set goals and values for the party. They’ll also choose delegates who will endorse candidates at future conventions, the Secretary of State’s website notes.

Click here for more information on how the caucuses work, and here for a history of the caucuses in Minnesota. For more information on the Democratic candidates, click here, or for the Republicans, click here.

Next Up

Related