Tests find mercury in some skin-lightening products sold in Minnesota, other states

Health officials are warning consumers to stop using certain skin-lightening products that contain dangerous levels of mercury. "The products are manufactured abroad and sold illegally in the United States—often in shops in Latino, Asian, African or Middle Eastern neighborhoods and online," according to a news release from the FDA.
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Health officials are warning consumers to stop using certain skin-lightening products that contain dangerous levels of mercury. "The products are manufactured abroad and sold illegally in the United States—often in shops in Latino, Asian, African or Middle Eastern neighborhoods and online," according to a news release from the FDA.

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