Updated:
Original:

The blue-green algae that can kill dogs has popped up in an Edina lake

Author:

People are being warned not to use a lake in the Twin Cities suburb of Edina, after algae levels reached a point where toxins in the water present a "public health risk."

High levels of blue-green algae have been reported in Lake Cornelia, which brings with it high levels of "microcystin" – a toxin produced by the freshwater bacteria that can be harmful to human health and can even kill pets.

Part of the lake shore is next to Rosland Park, south of Highway 62.

The City of Edina, in a press release issued Saturday, said it is "urging residents to stay away from the water" while follow-up tests are conducted, and water officials come up with a strategy for solving the problem.

What exactly is blue-green algae?

Blue green algae isn't actually an algae, but a freshwater bacteria called cyanobacteria. With foul-smelling blooms that resemble pea soup, it generally presents during warm weather when the water is stagnant and rich in nutrients.

Exposure to the toxins can be harmful to liver and kidney functions, with symptoms of poisoning including jaundice, shock, abdominal pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, severe thirst and a rapid pulse.

Pets are more at risk. Blooms reported in Minnesota back in spring resulted in the death of several dogs.

"The City is working with Nine Mile Creek Watershed District and an engineering consultant to strategize solutions for the problem," said Edina water resources coordinator Jessica Vanderwerff Wilson.

The presence of algae has presented even though the lake is treated twice a year by restoration companies, the city says.

The city will hold a meeting with residents to discuss solutions in November.

Next Up

Joe Ryan

Joe Ryan continues his dominant September

The right-hander struck out 11 batters in a victory over the Cubs.

Mounds view 9 - crime scene

Man who allegedly shot at police dies after being struck by squad vehicle

The unidentified individual fired shots at police following an alleged domestic disturbance, police say.

Karl-Anthony Towns

Karl-Anthony Towns reacts to Gersson Rosas firing: 'WTF'

The Timberwolves star was just as surprised as everyone else

Mounds View shooting incident 1 - county sheriff - crop

Deputy uses squad car to ram armed assault suspect, sheriff's office says

The man had fired multiple shots at officers, striking two of their vehicles, authorities said.

Daniel Carlson

Ex-Viking Daniel Carlson has become one of the NFL's best kickers

Carlson has been automatic since joining the Raiders.

Dustin Sundin crop

'Vulnerable' adult missing after leaving with family member's dog, phone

Authorities found footprints in a creek bed, but haven't been able to locate the man.

Mounds view 7 - crime scene

Police 'use of force' incident reported in Mounds View

The Minnesota BCA is investigating, with more details expected soon.

vaccine, covid

The 8 Minnesota counties still below a 50% vaccination rate

Fewer than half of all vaccine-eligible individuals in these areas have received at least one shot.

Dave Simonett Trampled by Turtles

Trampled By Turtles singer responds to complaints about concert vax requirements

Some of TBT's recent appearances have required proof of vaccine/negative test.

BMTN - Target drive up bag booze

The 5 cent charge for carryout bags is coming back in Minneapolis

The ordinance was suspended at the start of the pandemic.

Related

The blue-green algae that can kill dogs has popped up in an Edina lake

A lake in Edina is now a public health hazard because of blue-green algae.

Possibly poisonous blue-green algae was found in another Twin Cities lake

This type of blue-green algae has sickened humans and killed dogs.

Warm weather could contribute to growth of blue-green algae on Minn. lakes

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says to keep a lookout for blue-green algae on lakes because it comes with health risks. The toxic algae -- which has a pungent smell, and has a fluorescent green hue or could be pink or blue -- can cause rashes, nausea or vomiting both in humans, and could be potentially be fatal to pets.