The buck stops here: deer spends night on soccer field, antlers tangled in net - Bring Me The News

The buck stops here: deer spends night on soccer field, antlers tangled in net

DNR conservation officers came to the rescue of a white-tail buck that hopped a fence onto a college soccer field in La Crosse. Officials say the deer spent the night with his antlers caught in the netting of the goal. They attached a knife to a stick to cut the net from a safe distance, then opened a gate so the exhausted animal could stroll back to the woods.
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DNR conservation officers came to the rescue of a white-tail buck that hopped a fence onto a college soccer field in La Crosse. Officials say the deer spent the night with his antlers caught in the netting of the goal. They attached a knife to a stick to cut the net from a safe distance, then opened a gate so the exhausted animal could stroll back to the woods.

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