Tick season arrives a few weeks early

The Minnesota Health Department says deer ticks are already feeding in forested areas. The risk of tick-borne diseases doesn't typically start until late spring. Everyone is urged to take precautions to prevent tick bites.
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The Minnesota Health Department says deer ticks are already feeding in forested areas. The risk of tick-borne diseases doesn't typically start until late spring. Everyone is urged to take precautions to prevent tick bites.

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