Today is deadline for Republican, Democratic parties to turn in their redistricting ideas - Bring Me The News

Today is deadline for Republican, Democratic parties to turn in their redistricting ideas

A special court panel will likely have to decide how to redraw the districts because Dayton and Republican legislators probably won't agree on a plan. Every 10 years the state redraws the boundaries to account for population changes in the Census.
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A special court panel will likely have to decide how to redraw the districts because Dayton and Republican legislators probably won't agree on a plan. Every 10 years the state redraws the boundaries to account for population changes in the Census.

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