Toddler throwing tantrum? Best response is no response, says U researcher

A University of Minnesota scientist who co-authored a study on temper tantrums says the best approach is to look the other way. As long as the child is no danger to themselves or others, just let the emotions run their course. "Once the child was past being angry, what was left was sadness, and sad children reach out for comfort," say the authors behind the study.
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A University of Minnesota scientist who co-authored a study on temper tantrums says the best approach is to look the other way. As long as the child is no danger to themselves or others, just let the emotions run their course. "Once the child was past being angry, what was left was sadness, and sad children reach out for comfort," say the authors behind the study.

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Can rock music make you racist? Not exactly, says U of M researcher, but ...

The Daily Mail recently lit up the Internet with a story about a University of Minnesota research project. The headline: "Does listening to rock make you racist?" The professor behind the study says the headline was misleading, but the rest of the story captured her findings pretty well: "In a nutshell, we were testing the power of music to affect how people treat others. What we found was that music genre ... has a powerful effect on people's behavior," Prof. Heather LaMarre tells pop culture site Fuse.Tv.

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