Toddler throwing tantrum? Best response is no response, says U researcher - Bring Me The News

Toddler throwing tantrum? Best response is no response, says U researcher

A University of Minnesota scientist who co-authored a study on temper tantrums says the best approach is to look the other way. As long as the child is no danger to themselves or others, just let the emotions run their course. "Once the child was past being angry, what was left was sadness, and sad children reach out for comfort," say the authors behind the study.
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A University of Minnesota scientist who co-authored a study on temper tantrums says the best approach is to look the other way. As long as the child is no danger to themselves or others, just let the emotions run their course. "Once the child was past being angry, what was left was sadness, and sad children reach out for comfort," say the authors behind the study.

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