Tornado-damaged chimneys add risk for north Minneapolis residents - Bring Me The News

Tornado-damaged chimneys add risk for north Minneapolis residents

Minneapolis officials are warning north Minneapolis residents to be especially vigilant for chimney damage after last spring's tornado. Inspectors already found more than 200 damaged or blocked chimneys in the months since the storm. Officials say chimneys that don't vet properly can trap poisonous carbon monoxide.
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Minneapolis officials are warning north Minneapolis residents to be especially vigilant for chimney damage after last spring's tornado. Inspectors already found more than 200 damaged or blocked chimneys in the months since the storm. Officials say chimneys that don't vet properly can trap poisonous carbon monoxide.

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