Trial starts for Fargo doctor accused of drugging wife

Jury selection began Monday in the trial of surgeon Jon Norberg, who is accused of drugging his wife with the powerful anesthetic propofol, the drug that featured prominently in the death of pop singer Michael Jackson. Norberg is accused sexually assaulting his wife Alonna Norberg, alos a doctor, while she was sedated.
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Jury selection began Monday in the trial of surgeon Jon Norberg, who is accused of drugging his wife with the powerful anesthetic propofol, the drug that featured prominently in the death of pop singer Michael Jackson, Valley News Live reports. Norberg is accused sexually assaulting his wife Alonna Norberg, also a doctor, while she was sedated.

Lawyers and the judge in the case are taking special steps to get jurors who have not been overly influenced by a great deal of publicity surrounding the case, Detroit Lakes Online reports.

Jon Norberg early this year issued a detailed statement saying the drug was used as part of his wife's treatment for autoimmune disease, and that he gave her multiple injections of the drug, which he characterized as a well-intentioned mistake, Forum Communications reported.

Alonna Norberg told Forum that her husband inappropriately gave her the drug without her consent “to impair me and gratify himself sexually.”

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