Twin Cities mayors, business leaders bend ears at the White House

The Obama administration is meeting with business leaders from every state to discuss jobs and the economy. Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak says at their session "the Minnesotans weren't shy." General Mills, Cargill, and Surly Brewing were among the companies represented.
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The Obama administration is meeting with business leaders from every state to discuss jobs and the economy. Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak says at their session "the Minnesotans weren't shy." General Mills, Cargill, and Surly Brewing were among the companies represented.

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